Byzantine music

One of the foundations of authentic chanting (along with proper chronos, intervals, and vocalizations) is the use of good compositions. Genuine Byzantine music is based on textual accentuation and governed by a series of formulaic rules that dictate which melodic lines may be used to match a particular syllabic pattern. In addition, a series of orthographic rules ensures consistency and readability.

Byzantine music compositions in English which rigorously adhere to these formulaic and orthographic rules have only appeared in the past few years. The most prominent of these is the Divine Music Project by St. Anthony’s Monastery, whose material I prefer. Thanks to St Anthony’s Seminar on Composing Byzantine Music in English, I have myself begun to study the art of composing authentic Byzantine melodies. Below you can find (in no particular order) several scores of Byzantine music in English, which I have prepared in adherence to the formulaic and orthographic rules of composition.

It Is Truly Meet by Ioannis Arvanitis, Fourth Mode Agia Byzantine
Doxastika at the Praises for January 1, Plagal Second Mode and Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine
Kontakion of the Annunciation, long version by Ioannis Arvanitis, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine
Doxastikon at the Praises for the Sunday after the Nativity «Αίμα και πυρ», patriarchal melody, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Communion Hymn for Sundays by Ioasaph of Dionysiou, First Mode Byzantine
Holy Saturday idiomelon «Σε τον αναβαλλόμενον», Plagal First Mode Byzantine Western
Lenten Apolytikia of Sunday Vespers, Plagal First Mode Byzantine
Troparion of Kassiane, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Megalynarion of the Meeting in the Temple, Third Mode Byzantine Western
Trisagion, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Dynamis, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine
Doxasticon at the Praises of the Synaxis of the Archangels, Plagal First Mode Byzantine
Sunday Evening Vespers, Third Week of Lent, Kekragaria Byzantine
Sunday Evening Vespers, Third Week of Lent, Aposticha Byzantine
St George, Vespers Stichera Doxastikon, Plagal Second Mode Byzantine
St George, Aposticha Doxastikon, Fourth Mode Byzantine
St George, Orthros Idiomelon, Plagal Second Mode Byzantine
St George, Doxastikon of the Praises, Plagal First Mode Byzantine
Evlogitaria of the Reposed, Plagal First Mode Byzantine
Canon of the Akathist, Fourth Mode Byzantine
Katavasiæ of the Theotokos, Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Communion Hymn of Pentecost, First Mode Byzantine
Communion Hymn of All Saints, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Doxastikon of St Nicholas, Plagal Second Mode Byzantine Western
Psalm 22, Plagal First Mode Byzantine Western
First Kathisma of the Annunciation «Ο μέγας Στρατηγός» by George Rigas the Priest, First Mode Byzantine
Megalynarion of the Cross, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Kontakion of the Departed, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine Western
Rejoice, Thou Bride Unwedded, Plagal Fourth Mode Byzantine
Christ Is Risen, Plagal First Mode Byzantine
Stichera of Sts. Peter and Paul, Second Mode automelon Byzantine

The translation used for these hymns is that of the Holy Transfiguration Monastery in Brookline, chosen since many people throughout the world hold their liturgical translations in high regard due to their precision, meter, and elegance.